Traditionally, proponents of football analytics have been limited to the periphery of conversation in digesting the nation’s game. But in recent times audiences have begun turning a curious ear to that noisy bunch of statisticians who, for so long, have been confined to the fringe.

The consumption of football is changing, and that change is being marshalled by several progressive figures. We sat down with a selection of these individuals, each of whom is aiming, in their own way and across several different disciplines, to shake up the way we talk about football.

Dan Fieldsend, a former scout for Liverpool, offers insight on the evolving methods used to discover new talent, while Dan Abrahams, a sports psychologist, reveals the work he does to stretch out marginal gains in player performance.

Henry Winter of The Times casts his opinion on the rise in statistical analysis, and Damien Comolli, a Director of Football known for his past influence at Liverpool, Tottenham and Arsenal, looks to summarise the balance required when using such analyses.

Author of The Football Code, James Tippett, also chips in with his musings on how clubs with the right attitude to such statistics are using them to compete with the wealthier sides, usurping conventional hierarchy in the process.

In its latest iteration, Science of Football takes a holistic view of the work being done to ensure that the modern-day footballer is equipped with all the tools required to perform at the very top of their game.